Black, White and Green opened at Gallery at 14 Maple on March 3

On March 3, 2016,  Morris Arts hosted a free opening reception for the Gallery at 14 Maple’s fifteenth exhibit, entitled Black, White and Green – attended by an enthusiastic crowd of 180 people.  Guest curator Katherine Murdock, the Exhibition Committee of Morris Arts and the Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation selected works by the following outstanding New Jersey artists, Pat Brentano (Westfield), Jose Camacho (Montclair), Kathy Cantwell (Maplewood), Thea Clark (Maplewood), Carol Nussbaum (Short Hills), Casey Ruble (Milford), Nancy Ori (Berkley Heights), Jessica Rohrer (Bloomfield), and Raymond Saá (Maplewood). Two outstanding artists from New York are also featured: Richard Bottwin (Brooklyn) and Riad Miah (New York).

Inspired by the biowall, the vertical garden of living plants within the exhibit space, Curator Murdock chose to focus the exhibit on plants and selected the title, Black, White and Green, to purposefully reflect that limited color palette as a means of unifying the exhibit. What is striking, however, is the richness and variety of the artists’ unique approaches to the theme – through their use of different media (collage, oil, cold wax painting, photography, charcoal drawings, wood sculpture, etc.), composition, and subtle gradations of color. As Murdock notes, “Casey Ruble’s paper collage illustrates a bundled bouquet of invasive plant species and Kathy Cantwell’s oil and cold wax on panel explores green color fields that resemble landscape. Richard Bottwin uses plant material as a medium and highlights the wood grain with stain and paint.”  Pat Brentano combines cut paper and acrylic on canvas to highlight subtleties within the spectrum of green while Thea Clark, in essence, “creates” plant life with artificial turf, acrylic textile, cotton thread, wood and foam. Jose Camacho’s work focuses on the abstract, ghostly images of possible plant life in his black and white oils on paper.  Similarly, stark black and white is used to highlight Nature’s geometric precision in Carol Nussbaum’s striking flower mandala photos. Riad Miah’s use of electric green and geometric units suggests plant life on a cellular level while Nancy Ori’s photographs cut to the essence of botanical forms, revealing hidden structures. Jessica Rohrer’s gouache captures the green fluidity and grace of a hosta plant while the dramatic and intense charcoal drawings of Raymond Saá suggest the explosive release of energy of segmented structures that seem to collapse, yet still bristle with vitality.

 

Here are some photos from the opening:

The public is invited to view this exciting exhibit and to meet the artists at the free opening reception on March 3, 2016 from 6-8pm at Gallery at 14 Maple, a distinctive space located on the 3rd floor of the LEED certified “green” building at 14 Maple Avenue in Morristown, NJ. Refreshments will be served.

Morris Arts gratefully acknowledges sponsorship for this exhibit by
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with additional with additional support from

 

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The exhibit is open to the public Monday-Friday from 10am to 4pm and by appointment, and will remain on display until August 24, 2016.  Visit www.morrisarts.org or call (973) 285-5115 for additional information, including the exhibit catalogue which contains details and sale prices for all works. The Gallery at 14 Maple is a barrier-free facility. Individuals needing special accommodation should contact Kadie Dempsey at (973) 285-5115, x 17 or kdempsey@morrisarts.org.

Visual Griot, African American Exhibit opened at Atrium Gallery, January 29th

Over 300 people joined Morris Arts and Art in the Atrium at January 29th’s  free public opening of New Jersey’s largest exhibition of African-American art, curated and assembled by Art in the Atrium. The exhibit, entitled VISUAL GRIOT, incorporated 150 artworks by 30 outstanding African American artists. At the reception, crowds flocked to hear the talk by featured artist Alonzo Adams and they enjoyed the food, music and the opportunity to purchase artworks by many of the artists in the exhibit.

Here are some photos from the opening reception:

Click HERE for additional coverage, photos and videos by Kevin Coughlin of  MorristownGreen.com.

 

And here are some photos of artwork in the exhibit:

Running through March 16, the exhibit is entitled Visual Griot and highlights the work of Plainfield artist Alonzo Adams, as well as works by nearly 30 outstanding local and internationally known African American artists including Lavette Ballard, Bisa Butler, Leroy Campbell, Howard Cash, Stephen B. Ellis, Leslie Floyd, April Harrison, Janice Jamison, Julio Mejia, Maceo Mitchell, Janet Taylor Pickett, Ellaree Pray; Deborah Shedrick, Sandra P. Smith, and Ceaphus Stubbs, among others.

L-R: Rosalind Nzinga Nichol’s Bouquet; Sandra P. Smith’s No Do Overs; Bisa Butler’s quilt, Benin Beautiful; Leroy Campbell’s Courtship; Deborah Shedrick’s Reigning Queen #2; Janet Taylor Pickett’s And She Watches.

 

Born in 1961 in Harlem, NY and raised in Plainfield, NJ, Alonzo Adams’ passion for art was nurtured from the streets of Plainfield to the country roads of North Carolina and enriched by trips to France and Spain. He was inspired by such greats as Charles White, Henry O. Tanner, L’Hermitte, John Singer Sargent and Rembrandt.  Adams credits artist David Driskell with mentorship early in his career which helped define his ultimate direction and goals as an artist. With over 25 years as a professional award-winning artist, Adams hold a BFA from Rutgers, an MFA from University of Pennsylvania and had additional training at the Ducret School of the Arts and the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. One of the first African American artists to become an Absolut Artist, Adams was featured in the Black Romance exhibit at the Studio Museum of Harlem and three of his original oils were auctioned at Sotheby’s, with phenomenal response. He was also one of the first inductees into the Rutgers African American Alumnae Association Hall of Fame. His work is in various museum and private collections including that of Maya Angelou. Additionally, numerous publications have featured articles on Adams, including Art Business News, Black Enterprise, Images Magazine, Upscale Magazine and ESPN Magazine.

Previously, he served on the board of Plainfield NJ’s Ducret School of Art. He resides in Plainfield with his wife and two sons.

 

L-R: April Harrison’s Belle; Kara Rice’s Dust; detail from Janice Jamison’s quilt, Afro Princesses; Leslie Floyd’s Stanley; Charly Palmer’s Voting Booth; Ellaree Pray’s Square Biz.

Art in the Atrium’s annual exhibition is the largest of its kind in the state. “It really helps to expand people’s idea of what African-American art can be,’’ says Craig. “We have works in all mediums and genres. It’s not just figurative paintings with a mask in them.’’ The non-profit organization, Art in the Atrium, began in 1992 after Victoria Craig’s husband, attorney Charles Craig, noticed that no art works exhibited in the Morristown administration building were by African-American artists. Dedicated to exhibiting works by emerging and established black artists, Art in the Atrium is a nonprofit volunteer organization whose annual exhibit at the Atrium Gallery is now the largest of its kind in New Jersey, growing from a single floor to currently occupying 4 full floors of the County Administration & Records Building. Art in the Atrium has also expanded to include seminars, jazz brunches, collectors’ workshops and cosponsored artist residencies in the Morris School District, benefitting 200 to 500 students each year. It also awards an annual scholarship to a student artist, whose work is often exhibited in the show. For more information, visit www.artintheatrium.org.

The exhibition is made possible in part by funds from Morris Arts through the New Jersey State Council on the Arts/Department of State, a Partner Agency of the National Endowment for the Arts.

 

Morris Arts one of 18 Local Arts Agencies in the nation to win NEA grant

 

NEA logoMorris Arts (aka Arts Council of the Morris Area) is thrilled to report that the National Endowment for the Arts has awarded a $20,000 grant for its Our Heritage is Our Future, The Gateway Totem Project.  Stone carver and sculptor Gabriele Hiltl-Cohen will create a new, site-specific public art installation in the historic Speedwell section of Morristown. Morris Arts will collaborate with the Town of Morristown to implement a part of the town’s master plan by commissioning this new public artwork. The installation will serve as the centerpiece of a community park in an area identified by the town as being in need of redevelopment and will include community input and feature symbols and poetry reflecting the area’s changing demographic (Italian, Irish, African American and now a majority of Latino residents) that will pay homage to the many immigrants who have called this neighborhood home over the centuries. Public workshops and the design of a sculpture and gathering space in front of Grow it Green Morristown’s community garden will create a focal point that honors past, present and future residents and helps unite the community while fostering cross-cultural understanding and acceptance..

Among the many categories of recently announced grants, the National Endowment for the Arts awarded a total of $585,000 to 18 “Local Arts Agencies,” throughout the entire United States. “Morris Arts is thrilled to be in such select company,” commented Executive Director Tom Werder. “This grant constitutes national recognition for our public art initiatives to build community through the arts. We  are extremely grateful to have NEA support for this project.” United States Congressman Rodney P. Frelinghuysen added, “Congratulations on your award!”

The other 17 Local Arts Agencies that won NEA awards include: Scottsdale Cultural Council (aka Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art, Scottsdale, AZ); Ink People, Inc. (aka Ink People Center for the Arts, of Eureka, CA); Public Corporation for the Arts of the City of Long Beach (aka Arts Council for Long Beach, Long Beach, CA); Mariposa County Arts Council (Mariposa, CA); San Francisco Arts Commission (San Francisco, CA); Boulder County Arts Alliance (Boulder, CO); Telluride Council for the Arts and Humanities (aka Telluride Arts, Telluride, CO); Americans for the Arts, Inc. (Washington, DC); City of Atlanta, Georgia (aka Office of Cultural Affairs, Atlanta, GA); Arts Council of Princeton (aka ACP, Princeton, NJ); Queens Council on the Arts, Inc. (aka QCA, Astoria, NY); CNY Arts, Inc. (Syracuse, NY); Cincinnati Institute of Fine Arts (aka ArtsWave, Cincinnati, OH); Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council (aka GPAC, Pittsburgh, PA); ArtsMemphis (Memphis, TN); Cultural Development Authority of King County (aka 4Culture, Seattle, WA); and Methow Arts Alliance (aka Methow Arts, Twisp, WA).

 

 

 

 

Morris Arts (aka Arts Council of the Morris Area) is thrilled to report that the National Endowment for the Arts has awarded a $20,000 grant for its Our Heritage is Our Future, The Gateway Totem Project.  Stone carver and sculptor Gabriele Hiltl-Cohen will create a new, site-specific public art installation in the historic Speedwell section of Morristown. Morris Arts will collaborate with the Town of Morristown to implement a part of the town’s master plan by commissioning this new public artwork. The installation will serve as the centerpiece of a community park in an area identified by the town as being in need of redevelopment and will include community input and feature symbols and poetry reflecting the area’s changing demographic (Italian, Irish, African American and now a majority of Latino residents) that will pay homage to the many immigrants who have called this neighborhood home over the centuries. Public workshops and the design of a sculpture and gathering space in front of Grow it Green Morristown’s community garden will create a focal point that honors past, present and future residents and helps unite the community while fostering cross-cultural understanding and acceptance..

Among the many categories of recently announced grants, the National Endowment for the Arts awarded a total of $585,000 to 18 “Local Arts Agencies,” throughout the entire United States. “Morris Arts is thrilled to be in such select company,” commented Executive Director Tom Werder. “This grant constitutes national recognition for our public art initiatives to build community through the arts. We  are extremely grateful to have NEA support for this project.” United States Congressman Rodney P. Frelinghuysen added, “Congratulations on your award!”

The other 17 Local Arts Agencies that won NEA awards include: Scottsdale Cultural Council (aka Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art, Scottsdale, AZ); Ink People, Inc. (aka Ink People Center for the Arts, of Eureka, CA); Public Corporation for the Arts of the City of Long Beach (aka Arts Council for Long Beach, Long Beach, CA); Mariposa County Arts Council (Mariposa, CA); San Francisco Arts Commission (San Francisco, CA); Boulder County Arts Alliance (Boulder, CO); Telluride Council for the Arts and Humanities (aka Telluride Arts, Telluride, CO); Americans for the Arts, Inc. (Washington, DC); City of Atlanta, Georgia (aka Office of Cultural Affairs, Atlanta, GA); Arts Council of Princeton (aka ACP, Princeton, NJ); Queens Council on the Arts, Inc. (aka QCA, Astoria, NY); CNY Arts, Inc. (Syracuse, NY); Cincinnati Institute of Fine Arts (aka ArtsWave, Cincinnati, OH); Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council (aka GPAC, Pittsburgh, PA); ArtsMemphis (Memphis, TN); Cultural Development Authority of King County (aka 4Culture, Seattle, WA); and Methow Arts Alliance (aka Methow Arts, Twisp, WA).

Morris Arts one of 18 Local Arts Agencies in the nation to win NEA grant

 

 

 

 

 

 

Morris Arts (aka Arts Council of the Morris Area) is thrilled to report that the National Endowment for the Arts has awarded a $20,000 grant for its Our Heritage is Our Future, The Gateway Totem Project.  Stone carver and sculptor Gabriele Hiltl-Cohen will create a new, site-specific public art installation in the historic Speedwell section of Morristown. Morris Arts will collaborate with the Town of Morristown to implement a part of the town’s master plan by commissioning this new public artwork. The installation will serve as the centerpiece of a community park in an area identified by the town as being in need of redevelopment and will include community input and feature symbols and poetry reflecting the area’s changing demographic (Italian, Irish, African American and now a majority of Latino residents) that will pay homage to the many immigrants who have called this neighborhood home over the centuries. Public workshops and the design of a sculpture and gathering space in front of Grow it Green Morristown’s community garden will create a focal point that honors past, present and future residents and helps unite the community while fostering cross-cultural understanding and acceptance..

Among the many categories of recently announced grants, the National Endowment for the Arts awarded a total of $585,000 to 18 “Local Arts Agencies,” throughout the entire United States. “Morris Arts is thrilled to be in such select company,” commented Executive Director Tom Werder. “This grant constitutes national recognition for our public art initiatives to build community through the arts. We  are extremely grateful to have NEA support for this project.” United States Congressman Rodney P. Frelinghuysen added, “Congratulations on your award!”

The other 17 Local Arts Agencies that won NEA awards include: Scottsdale Cultural Council (aka Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art, Scottsdale, AZ); Ink People, Inc. (aka Ink People Center for the Arts, of Eureka, CA); Public Corporation for the Arts of the City of Long Beach (aka Arts Council for Long Beach, Long Beach, CA); Mariposa County Arts Council (Mariposa, CA); San Francisco Arts Commission (San Francisco, CA); Boulder County Arts Alliance (Boulder, CO); Telluride Council for the Arts and Humanities (aka Telluride Arts, Telluride, CO); Americans for the Arts, Inc. (Washington, DC); City of Atlanta, Georgia (aka Office of Cultural Affairs, Atlanta, GA); Arts Council of Princeton (aka ACP, Princeton, NJ); Queens Council on the Arts, Inc. (aka QCA, Astoria, NY); CNY Arts, Inc. (Syracuse, NY); Cincinnati Institute of Fine Arts (aka ArtsWave, Cincinnati, OH); Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council (aka GPAC, Pittsburgh, PA); ArtsMemphis (Memphis, TN); Cultural Development Authority of King County (aka 4Culture, Seattle, WA); and Methow Arts Alliance (aka Methow Arts, Twisp, WA).

 

 

 

 

Morris Arts (aka Arts Council of the Morris Area) is thrilled to report that the National Endowment for the Arts has awarded a $20,000 grant for its Our Heritage is Our Future, The Gateway Totem Project.  Stone carver and sculptor Gabriele Hiltl-Cohen will create a new, site-specific public art installation in the historic Speedwell section of Morristown. Morris Arts will collaborate with the Town of Morristown to implement a part of the town’s master plan by commissioning this new public artwork. The installation will serve as the centerpiece of a community park in an area identified by the town as being in need of redevelopment and will include community input and feature symbols and poetry reflecting the area’s changing demographic (Italian, Irish, African American and now a majority of Latino residents) that will pay homage to the many immigrants who have called this neighborhood home over the centuries. Public workshops and the design of a sculpture and gathering space in front of Grow it Green Morristown’s community garden will create a focal point that honors past, present and future residents and helps unite the community while fostering cross-cultural understanding and acceptance..

Among the many categories of recently announced grants, the National Endowment for the Arts awarded a total of $585,000 to 18 “Local Arts Agencies,” throughout the entire United States. “Morris Arts is thrilled to be in such select company,” commented Executive Director Tom Werder. “This grant constitutes national recognition for our public art initiatives to build community through the arts. We  are extremely grateful to have NEA support for this project.” United States Congressman Rodney P. Frelinghuysen added, “Congratulations on your award!”

The other 17 Local Arts Agencies that won NEA awards include: Scottsdale Cultural Council (aka Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art, Scottsdale, AZ); Ink People, Inc. (aka Ink People Center for the Arts, of Eureka, CA); Public Corporation for the Arts of the City of Long Beach (aka Arts Council for Long Beach, Long Beach, CA); Mariposa County Arts Council (Mariposa, CA); San Francisco Arts Commission (San Francisco, CA); Boulder County Arts Alliance (Boulder, CO); Telluride Council for the Arts and Humanities (aka Telluride Arts, Telluride, CO); Americans for the Arts, Inc. (Washington, DC); City of Atlanta, Georgia (aka Office of Cultural Affairs, Atlanta, GA); Arts Council of Princeton (aka ACP, Princeton, NJ); Queens Council on the Arts, Inc. (aka QCA, Astoria, NY); CNY Arts, Inc. (Syracuse, NY); Cincinnati Institute of Fine Arts (aka ArtsWave, Cincinnati, OH); Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council (aka GPAC, Pittsburgh, PA); ArtsMemphis (Memphis, TN); Cultural Development Authority of King County (aka 4Culture, Seattle, WA); and Methow Arts Alliance (aka Methow Arts, Twisp, WA).

Morris Artists create New Jersey’s Ornaments for DC Holiday Display at President’s Park

Morris Artists; Cristina Mendoza, Susan Faiola and Dan Fenelon to Create New Jersey’s Ornaments for Holiday Display at President’s Park in Washington, D.C.

ORNAMENTS FROM ALL 56 U.S. STATES, TERRITORIES, AND THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA INSPIRE PEOPLE TO FIND THEIR PARK DURING THE HOLIDAYS

WASHINGTON (October 8, 2015) The National Park Foundation, the official charity of America’s national parks, announced today that Cristina Mendoza, Susan Faiola and Dan Fenelon have been chosen to create New Jersey’s ornaments for the 2015 America Celebrates: Ornaments from Across the USA display at President’s Park (White House) in Washington, D.C. Cristina Mendoza, Susan Faiola and Dan Fenelon joins local artists from each U.S. state, territory, and the District of Columbia in designing ornaments inspired by America’s national parks and their programs, paying tribute to the upcoming National Park Service Centennial in 2016.

The ornament display honors the holiday season and celebrates the National Christmas Tree Lighting, a national event presented by the National Park Foundation and the National Park Service.

The 93rd annual National Christmas Tree Lighting, being held on Thursday, December 3, 2015, at 5 p.m., is a great example of the countless ways there are to find your park. Launched in March 2015, Find Your Park/Encuentra Tu Parque is a public awareness and education movement to inspire people to connect with, celebrate, and support America’s national parks and community-based programs. Celebrating the National Park Service Centennial and setting the stage for the Service’s next 100 years, Find Your Park invites people to discover and share their own unique connections to our nation’s natural landscapes, vibrant culture, and rich history.

“It is an honor to be selected because I get to be a part of something bigger than I imagined while working together with other local artists,” said Cristina Mendoza. “I am excited to be a part of the America Celebrates display because it is a new way for me to represent New Jersey in a creative way.”
Christina joins two other NJ artists, her former mentors from an after school Art Mentoring program at Morristown High School sponsored by Morris Arts and the Lauren and Emily Failla Foundation. Christina is a graduate of the program and now pursues her art full time as a junior at the College of Saint Elizabeth’s here in NJ.

All three artists were inspired by the local national parks and nature here in New Jersey. Cristina Mendoza is a sculptural artist who has most recently worked with handmade paper. She uses a series of drawings to highlight Morristown’s history along with New Jersey’s densely wooded scenery while creating the ornaments.

Artist Susan Faiola created ornaments featuring birds and animals native to New Jersey decoupaging those images with layers of Americana inside each globe. Each ornament features the name of a New Jersey National Park.

Artist Dan Fenelon also drew his inspiration from the National Parks here in NJ and painted the ornaments in his signature style incorporating vivid color and infusing his art with multi-cultural icons to reflect the rich diversity of New Jersey’s population.

“Art can be an incredible way for people to connect with national parks and we’re thrilled to carry on the time honored tradition of debuting ornaments from all over the country,” said Will Shafroth, president and CEO of the National Park Foundation. “We’re honored to have Cristina Mendoza Susan Faiola and Dan Fenelon represent New Jersey in this year’s America Celebrates display.”

As one of America’s oldest holiday traditions, the National Christmas Tree Lighting began on Christmas Eve in 1923, when President Calvin Coolidge lit a Christmas tree in front of 3,000 spectators on the Ellipse in President’s Park. Since 1923, each succeeding president has carried on the tradition. In addition to the America Celebrates display, President’s Park hosts a variety of family-oriented holiday attractions, including nightly holiday performances, and model train display.

For more information, please visit www.thenationaltree.org and follow the National Christmas Tree on Twitter at @TheNationalTree. Join the conversation online using the hashtag #NCTL2015.

ABOUT THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE
More than 20,000 National Park Service employees care for America’s 408 national parks and work with communities across the nation to help preserve local history and create close-to-home recreational opportunities.

The National Park Service has cared for the White House and its grounds since 1933. President’s Park, which includes the Ellipse and Lafayette Park, was officially included in the national park system in 1961.
Visit us at: www.nps.gov, on Facebook: www.facebook.com/nationalparkservice,
Twitter: www.twitter.com/natlparkservice, and YouTube: www.youtube.com/nationalparkservice.

ABOUT THE NATIONAL PARK FOUNDATION
The National Park Foundation is the official charity of America’s national parks and nonprofit partner to the National Park Service. Chartered by Congress in 1967, the National Park Foundation raises private funds to help PROTECT more than 84 million acres of national parks through critical conservation and preservation efforts, CONNECT all Americans with their incomparable natural landscapes, vibrant culture and rich history, and INSPIRE the next generation of park stewards. Find out more and become a part of the national park community at www.nationalparks.org

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6th Annual Pumpkin Illumination on October 25th

Banner for Website

 Our 6th Annual Pumpkin Illumination will be held on Sunday, October 25 at 5:00 p.m.
at the Vail Mansion located at 110 South Street, Morristown, NJ.
Bring your carved pumpkin to light at dusk for an evening of family fun for all ages!

 

5:15 p.m. – Bring your carved pumpkin to the reflecting pond in front of the Vail Mansion in Morristown. Enjoy live jazz by Dan Filipak and Caleb Rumley!

The Dan Filipak Dixieland-style Jazz Band will transform you from New Jersey to New Orleans, from South Street in 2015 to Basin Street in 1915. When the music hits you’ll feel a pep in your step, a stride in your glide and a dip in your hip. Spectators are dared not to dance. Co-led by the always swingin’ and singin’ Caleb Rumley on trombone.

5:30 to 6:15 p.m. – Art Workshop with artist Dan Fenelon followed by a luminary parade led by Morristown Mayor Tim Dougherty.

Dan Fenelon works with communities to create one of a kind original art projects. In keeping with the “Halloween” theme, there will be creatures and masks to decorate culminating in a parade before the Pumpkins are illuminated.

6:15 p.m. – Pumpkin Illumination! Lighting of the pumpkins.

Pumpkin Illumination Postcard Back

If you need special assistance call Kadie Dempsey, 973-285-5115 ext. 17

A special thank you to our Pumpkin Illumination event sponsors: MetLife Foundation, Mondelēz, and Jockey Hollow Bar & Kitchen.

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Last chance: Blackwell St. Juried Student Exhibit closing on April 24th

Less than a week remains to see this exhibit of the top high school artists in the county on display at the Atrium. Over 450 young artists, their teachers, family and friends, along with the general public and artists attended the March 27th Opening Reception of the 27th annual Blackwell Street Juried Student Exhibit at the Atrium Gallery.  Located on Floors 2-5 of the Morris County Administration and Records Building, 10 Court Street in Morristown, the exhibit includes over 350 works of art by top students from approximately 20 high schools throughout Morris County and beyond. Embracing a very wide variety of media (sculpture, oil, acrylic, collage, multimedia, etching, charcoal, pen and ink, graphite, photography,  etc.), the artworks are a stunning tribute to the creativity, skill and passion of these young artists.

Mary Ann St. Jacques, a Photography and 3D Design teacher at Madison High School, commented: “My students, their parents, and I all had a wonderful evening. I saw so many students from opposing schools complementing each other’s work and talking about their projects and inspiration. It was a great forum for young artists to see the importance of collaboration and exposure to different techniques and approaches to similar projects. My kids are already brainstorming for next year!

A panel of five professional artists from the Blackwell Street Center for the Arts comprises the jury selecting approximately 350 works from nearly 800 submissions by talented high school students from throughout the County. The show was then organized, hung and administered by the all-volunteer members of the Blackwell Street Center for the Arts, their friends and family. There were multiple ribbon categories, with Best In Show and the 1st Place ribbons receiving monetary prizes. The opening reception included an awards presentation (on the 5th floor, in the Freeholder meeting room), music, food,  and the opportunity to meet these talented young artists in person.

Above: Best in Show: Butler HS student Rachel D’Agnilli’s charcoal, Untitled. 

Evolving from an exhibit that, in 1988, featured approximately 90 pieces of art, to this current, massive undertaking, the Juried Student Show is unique in its democratic approach:  there are no restrictions on the number of pieces a school can submit and submissions are open to public, private, parochial and home-schooled high school student artists from throughout Morris County.  Each year, hundreds of students, parents, teachers and friends attend in support of these exceptional young artists.

Morris Arts manages the Atrium Art Gallery, selecting artists and scheduling exhibits on behalf of the Morris County Board of Chosen Freeholders.  The Atrium Gallery is free and open to the public during business hours, from 8:30am – 4:30pm on Mondays-Fridays. The exhibit will run from March 27 through April 24, 2015. For additional information about the show, contact Dr. Lynn L. Siebert, Gallery Director, and Director of Arts Participation & Communication for Morris Arts, (973) 285-5115, ext. 10 or Lsiebert@morrisarts.org

Kendra Nola's oil, Hot & Cold  Small, NIcole Ramirez's scratchboard, Reflection (Madison)small, Sara Cecere's mixed media Shark Week (Mendham)

 

L-R: Nicole Ramirez’s scratchboard work, Reflections (Madison); Sarah Cecere’s mixed media, Shark Week (Mendham); Garrett Temple’s ceramic work, Soft and Hard (Roxbury).

small, Maureen Shelley oil, Na Pali Coast (Mendham)

small, Olivia Kuchta's charcoal and chalk pastel work, Cold Feet (Morris Knolls)small, Carlo Zarro's stoneware and high fire glaze, Carl's Rhino (small, Maggie Walter's acrylic, Super Moon in Dublin (Mendham)small, Elizabeth Davalos' collage, Antiquities (Mt. Olive)

 

 

 

 

 

L-R: Maureen Shelley’s oil, Na Pali Coast (Mendham); Oliva Kuchta’s charcoal and chalk pastel work, Cold Feet (Morris Knolls); Carlo Zarro’s stoneware & high fire glaze, Carl’s Rhino (Randolph); Maggie Walter’s acrylic, Super Moon in Dublin (Mendham); Elizabeth Davalos’ collage, Antiquities (Mt. Olive).

small, Kendra Nolan's oil, Hot and Cold (Jefferson Twp).small, Lauren Bromley's oil, En Grisaille (Mendham)small, Jordan Seagrave's watercolor & Graphite, After Duchampssmall,Rosa Chang's acrylic, The Need for Restraint (Mt. Olive)small, Danielle Winkler's pencil work, Untitled (Butler)

 

 

 

 

 

L-R: Kendra Nola’s oil, Hot & Cold (Butler)Lauren Bromley’s oil, En Grisaille (Mendham);Jordan Seagrave’s watercolor & graphite, After Duchamps (Roxbury); Rosa Chang’s acrylic, The Need for Restraint (Mt. Olive)Danielle Winkler’s pencil work Untitled (Butler).

Below, L-R: Miu Sakamoto’s scratchboard work, Life (Mountain Lakes); Maxwell Creager’s ballpoint, Picasso meets Vermeer (Mendham); Jennifer Cappuccio’s paper mache sculpture, Drops of Hope (Montville Township); Brooke Downe’s oil, Courtney (Mountain Lakes); Julia Penny’s pastel, Rotten Fruit (Academy of St. Elizabeth).

small, Miu Sakamoto's scratchboard, Life (Mt. Lakes)

small, Maxwell Creager's ballpoint, Picasso meets Vermeer (Mendham)

small, Jennifer Cappuccio's paper mache, Drops of Hope (Montville Twp)

small, Brooke Downes' oil, Courtney (Mt. Lakes)

small, Julia Penny's pastel, Rotten Fruit (Academy of St. Elizabeth)

 

 

 

 

 

Photos from the Opening Reception:

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IMG_9264

 

 

 

 

 

 

Best in show artist Rachel D’Agnilli (middle) with the winning artwork and her parents; The Blackwell Street Center for the Arts artists who do the “heavy lifting” for this show – L-R: Dave Gruol, Peggy Dressel, Annette Hannah, Elaine Provost and Roy Provost.

 

Below: Some of the crowds at the Opening Reception; Standing room only at the award ceremony:

 

 

Morristown CraftMarket seeks artists for nationally acclaimed show

MorristownCraft show mental sculpture

MORRISTOWN CRAFTMARKET SEEKS ARTISTS

FOR NATIONALLY ACCLAIMED FINE ART & CRAFT SHOW

October Event Raises Thousands of Dollars for Local Charities,

 Attracts Artists From Over 25 States

Calling all artists! The Morristown CraftMarket, one of the top juried fine art and craft shows in the nation and a not-for-profit event sponsored by the Kiwanis Club of Randolph, NJ, seeks artists to display and sell their work at this year’s show. Now in its 39th consecutive year, the Morristown CraftMarket will run from Friday, October 16 through Sunday, October 18, 2015 at the National Guard Armory, 430 Western Avenue, Morristown, NJ. The Morristown CraftMarket features 160 gifted artists from 25 states throughout the country who sell their original works in jewelry, ceramics, glass, wearable fiber, wood, metal, leather and more.

NEW for 2015:  Cash prizes and ribbons will be awarded in multiple categories.

The artist application deadline is April 1, 2015.  Artists need to apply on-line at www.zapplication.org  For more information, visit the Morristown CraftMarket’s website at www.morristowncraftmarket.org or call 973-442-2840.

“The Morristown CraftMarket is a nationally acclaimed fine art and craft show that showcases top juried fine arts and crafts in all contemporary media, and raises thousands of dollars for charities in our community,” said Geoff Price, show director.

Free lecture by sculptor Sassona Norton on April 1

Sassona Norton's 9-11 Memorial 1011986.jgPlease join Morris Arts on Wednesday, April 1st, at the Park Avenue Club for a free lecture by the artist Sassona Norton on her sculpture and the importance of monuments. This evening is the first in a series of special conversations with artists who share their artistic outlook with the public in an intimate and festive setting. Morris Arts selected sculptor Sassona Norton as the first artist in the series due to the public aspect of her unique vision.

Register HERE today. Please RSVP by Wednesday, March 25, 2015. 

Left: Sassona Norton’s monumental bronze 9/11 Memorial (Montgomery County, PA)

The 9/11 Memorial that Norton installed in Pennsylvania made her acutely aware of the role public-art takes in our life. In an exciting evening, the artist will tell the story of the 9/11 Memorial that propelled her to recently embark on planning a Hurricane Sandy monument to celebrate people’s strength against crisis. In a talk that includes a slide-show and a short movie about the 9/11 Memorial, Sassona Norton will unveil her plan for an incredible, dynamic and huge monument to Hurricane Sandy. Installed at the Hudson Waterfront, the monument will combine a sculpture of very large hands and a dramatic water-theater. On a clear day, it will be seen from as far as Lower Manhattan.

imagesSculptor Sassona Norton

1012008

images (2)Sassona-Norton_Touch-550x681

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

L-R:  Other remarkable, monumental sculptures by Norton: To Whom Do I Pray, A Question of Certainty, and Touch.

Please plan to arrive at 6:45. The talk will start promptly at 7:00 and will be followed by a desert buffet and fruit, coffee and tea.

Park Avenue Club is located at 184 Park Avenue, Florham Park, NJ 07932

Admission is free – reservations are required.
Register HERE today. Please RSVP by Wednesday, March 25, 2015. 

Sassona Norton Artist Lecture (small)

Morris Arts’ GALLERY at 14 MAPLE: A SURE HAND; Free Sassona Norton Lecture

The gift

The giftThe gift
small, squared Sassona Norton The GiftOver 150 people attended the February 25th opening reception for Morris Arts’ its thirteenth exhibit, A SURE HAND,  at the Gallery at 14 Maple.  Artists Sassona Norton (Bedminster), Doug DePice (Secaucus), Neal Korn (Union) and Arlene Gale Milgram (Trenton) were there, and spoke with members of the public about their works. Commenting on the Exhibition Committee’s process for the show, Curator Dick Eger noted: “We selected works that embodied the defining element of drawings – simplicity….
Drawing juxtaposes the austerity of the single line with the power of the image that emerges. It is the sure hand of these artists that transforms the humble into the extraordinary.”

Left: Sassona Norton’s drawing,  Gift.

Responding to the “rich architecture” of hands, Sassona Norton’s works focus on the intricacies and complexity of the hand.  Providing Norton with its variety of shapes and forms, the hand can mark the passing of time and express a remarkable range of emotions through gesture and position. By using a much larger scale, filling an entire canvas with hands, Norton intensifies the details of the hands, capturing a sculptural quality, implying what is absent and reflecting both tangible and intangible qualities of humanity. As Curator Eger adds,  Norton philosophizes  “about the shortness of life, the concept of yearning, the sadness of want and the fierce desire to change reality. She effortlessly folds these themes into her exuberant charcoals of hands.”

small, Doug DePice's Portrait of Anne Frank, white with tapesmall, Neal Korn's Head Over to Seaport Marine, hi rez

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

L-R: Doug DePice’s Portrait of Anne Frank with Tape; Neal Korn’s drawing, Head Over to Seaport Marine.

With work that is both visceral and metaphorical, Doug DePice captures the horror of the Holocaust in his dark and powerful drawings.  Inspired by Eli Wiesel’s book, Night, Depice describes his works such as The Chimneys  thus: “I found the imagery of the smoke to appear heavy with the death of countless souls, and also thick with madness.” Images of the Crematorium are “succinct, frightening” and he adds, “To me, these forms are like giant tombstones of history.” With his portraits of Anne Frank, DePice strives to give some artistic expression to Anne Frank’s haunting words. In the portrait of Anne’s face with tape and charcoal, he states, “I wanted the surface to be scarred, marked and ripped as a visual reminder of the distress, anxiety, and uneasiness which gnawed daily at Anne’s psychological well-being.” DePice wants art to be a light in a world filled with the “darkness of ignorance and hate.”

The Chimneys 049

small,Milgram_Constant Motion

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

L-R: Doug DePice’s drawing,The Chimneys; Arlene Gale Milgram’s drawing, Constant Motion.

Artist Arlene Gale Milgram considers her art to be abstract but, at its core, her way “of processing my life experience.” She channels her thoughts and works in different densities and rhythms, often reclaiming resources from “failed” works to start new pieces. Mixed media works are layered as is life – “full of false starts and new beginnings.”  She adds, “The scars that remain are maps of time and experience.”  More  recently, she has focused on aging, support systems and “the fragile threads that hold us together.”  She doesn’t expect the viewer to read her “story” in the works but rather to engage them, involve them in her images and enable them to connect to “shared humanity.”

The drawings of Neal Korn present us with a unique juxtaposition of familiar imagery and unusual, striking perspectives. A simple portrait is literally “turned on its head” in a wash of color in Head Over to Seaport Marine and his portrayal of iconic images such as Lincoln’s monument or the Union Cannon grab the eye with their imaginative and dramatic vantage points as well as with a touch of humor and whimsy. “That is my head being blown out of the cannon,” he remarked. His “Icon” series includes drawings of images from Sandy Hook (NJ), Philadelphia (PA), NYC (NY) and Baltimore (MD).  Combining a tight, analytical drawing style with the “loose” application of rice paper, to provide texture and contrast and add an intuitive component, Korn creates images of dramatic and intriguing appeal.

Each of these four artists uses the medium of drawing to capture subtleties, delicacy, monumentalism and gesture in distinctive and memorable ways. Not the two dimensional tracing of a line on a surface here -but rather the power, the volume, motion and weight of each artist’s vision is captured in these exceptional and dramatic drawings which redefine the usual understanding of this medium and enhance our appreciation of its inherent magic.

To view the catalogue for this exhibit, click HERE.

 UPCOMING FREE LECTURE BY SASSONA NORTON
on her sculpture and the importance of monuments

April 1, 2015 at Park Avenue Club, Florham Park

Sassona Norton's 9-11 Memorial 1011986.jg

Please join Morris Arts on Wednesday, April 1st, at the Park Avenue Club for a free lecture by the artist Sassona Norton on her sculpture and the importance of monuments. This evening is the first in a series of special conversations with artists who share their artistic outlook with the public in an intimate and festive setting. Morris Arts selected sculptor Sassona Norton as the first artist in the series due to the public aspect of her unique vision.

Register HERE today. Please RSVP by Wednesday, March 25, 2015. 

 

Left: Sassona Norton’s monumental bronze 9/11 Memorial (Montgomery County, PA)

The 9/11 Memorial that Norton installed in Pennsylvania made her acutely aware of the role public-art takes in our life. In an exciting evening, the artist will tell the story of the 9/11 Memorial that propelled her to recently embark on planning a Hurricane Sandy monument to celebrate people’s strength against crisis. In a talk that includes a slide-show and a short movie about the 9/11 Memorial, Sassona Norton will unveil her plan for an incredible, dynamic and huge monument to Hurricane Sandy. Installed at the Hudson Waterfront, the monument will combine a sculpture of very large hands and a dramatic water-theater. On a clear day, it will be seen from as far as Lower Manhattan.

imagesSculptor Sassona Norton

1012008

images (2)Sassona-Norton_Touch-550x681

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

L-R:  Other remarkable, monumental sculptures by Norton: To Whom Do I Pray, A Question of Certainty, and Touch.

Please plan to arrive at 6:45. The talk will start promptly at 7:00 and will be followed by a desert buffet and fruit, coffee and tea.

Park Avenue Club is located at 184 Park Avenue, Florham Park, NJ 07932

Admission is free – reservations are required.
Register HERE today. Please RSVP by Wednesday, March 25, 2015. 

Sassona Norton Artist Lecture (small)

Photos from the opening reception of A Sure Hand:

and some additional photos, courtesy of photographer Michael Gale:

 

Morris Arts gratefully acknowledges sponsorship for this exhibit by

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and additional support from

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The exhibit is open to the public Monday-Friday from 10am to 4pm and by appointment, and will remain on display until August 27, 2015.  Visit www.morrisarts.org or call (973) 285-5115 for additional information, including the exhibit catalogue which contains details and sale prices for all works. The Gallery at 14 Maple is a barrier-free facility. Individuals needing special accommodation should contact Kadie Dempsey at (973) 285-5115, x 17 or kdempsey@morrisarts.org.

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Bill Staines at the Minstrel

Bet you’ve been singing Bill Staine’s songs for years – Roseville Fair, All God’s Critters Got a Place in the Choir. Now you can sing along with the composer. Gerry and Olga open. Free parking.

Wheelchair accessible